Click here to translate this page. translate gadget at page bottom

 

 


Jack Challem's NUTRITION REPORTER Newsletter Archive


NUTRITION REPORTER Archive


Home

 


There is no longer any question about it. Vitamin therapy is of proven benefit to real patients with real illnesses. If your doctor, family member, or local internet troll disagrees, then they don't know Jack - - Jack Challem, that is: bestselling author, and publisher of The NUTRITION REPORTER newsletter.

Jack Challem has helped so many, many people. His newsletter set high standards for popular nutrition education. As an orthomolecular advocate, and a just plain great guy, Jack was and will remain tops in my book. In fact, my own books first got published because Jack connected me with one of his own publishers. He graciously sent me this compilation of 19 years of his Newsletters to assist me, and my daughter, in the writing of our books. I think he'd like you to be able to learn from them as much as I have. Thank you, Jack. You remain a righteous man.


Scroll way down the page for my reviews of two of Jack's books.


CHALLEM ARCHIVE of Over 200 Issues of The Nutrition Reporter, 1995-2013

1995 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

April1995NutritionReporter.pdf

April1995NutritionReporter.pdf

April1995NutritionReporter.pdf

May1995NutritionReporter.pdf

June1995NutritionReporter.pdf

July1995NutritionReporter.pdf

August1995NutritionReporter.pdf

September1995NutritionReporter.pdf

October1995NutritionReporter.pdf

November1995NutritionReporter.pdf

December1995NutritionReporter.pdf


1996 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January1996NutritionReporter.pdf

February1996NutritionReporter.pdf

FebruarySupp1996NutritionReporter.pdf

March1996NutritionReporter.pdf

April1996NutritionReporter.pdf

May1996NutritionReporter.pdf

June1996NutritionReporter.pdf

July1996NutritionReporter.pdf

August1996NutritionReporter.pdf

September1996NutritionReporter.pdf

October1996NutritionReporter.pdf

November1996NutritionReporter.pdf

December1996NutritionReporter.pdf


1997 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January1997NutritionReporter.pdf

February1997NutritionReporter.pdf

February1997SuppNutritionReporter.pdf

March1997NutritionReporter.pdf

April1997NutritionReporter.pdf

May1997NutritionReporter.pdf

June1997NutritionReporter.pdf

July1997NutritionReporter.pdf

August1997NutritionReporter.pdf

September1997NutritionReporter.pdf

October1997NutritionReporter.pdf

November1997NutritionReporter.pdf

December1997NutritionReporter.pdf


1998 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January1998NutritionReporter.pdf

February1998NutritionReporter.pdf

March1998NutritionReporter.pdf

April1998NutritionReporter.pdf

May1998NutritionReporter.pdf

June1998NutritionReporter.pdf

July1998NutritionReporter.pdf

August1998NutritionReporter.pdf

September1998NutritionReporter.pdf

October1998NutritionReporter.pdf

November1998NutritionReporter.pdf

December1998NutritionReporter.pdf


1999 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January1999NutritionReporter.pdf

February1999NutritionReporter.pdf

March1999NutritionReporter.pdf

April1999NutritionReporter.pdf

May1999NutritionReporter.pdf

June1999NutritionReporter.pdf

July1999NutritionReporter.pdf

August1999NutritionReporter.pdf

September1999NutritionReporter.pdf

October1999NutritionReporter.pdf

November1999NutritionReporter.pdf

December1999NutritionReporter.pdf


2000 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2000NutritionReporter.pdf

February 2000 NutritionReporter is not available.

March2000NutritionReporter.pdf

April2000NutritionReporter.pdf

May2000NutritionReporter.pdf

June2000NutritionReporter.pdf

July2000NutritionReporter.pdf

August2000NutritionReporter.pdf

September2000NutritionReporter.pdf

October2000NutritionReporter.pdf

November2000NutritionReporter.pdf

December2000NutritionReporter.pdf


2001 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2001NutritionReporter.pdf

February2001NutritionReporter.pdf

March2001NutritionReporter.pdf

April2001NutritionReporter.pdf

May2001NutritionReporter.pdf

June2001NutritionReporter.pdf

July2001NutritionReporter.pdf

August2001NutritionReporter.pdf

September2001NutritionReporter.pdf

October2001NutritionReporter.pdf

November2001NutritionReporter.pdf

December2001NutritionReporter.pdf


2002 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2002NutritionReporter.pdf

February2002NutritionReporter.pdf

March2002NutritionReporter.pdf

April2002NutritionReporter.pdf

May2002NutritionReporter.pdf

June2002NutritionReporter.pdf

July2002NutritionReporter.pdf

August2002NutritionReporter.pdf

September2002NutritionReporter.pdf

October2002NutritionReporter.pdf

November2002NutritionReporter.pdf

December2002NutritionReporter.pdf


2003 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2003NutritionReporter.pdf

February2003NutritionReporter.pdf

March2003NutritionReporter.pdf

April2003NutritionReporter.pdf

May2003NutritionReporter.pdf

June2003NutritionReporter.pdf

July2003NutritionReporter.pdf

August2003NutritionReporter.pdf

September2003NutritionReporter.pdf

October2003NutritionReporter.pdf

November2003NutritionReporter.pdf

December2003NutritionReporter.pdf


2004 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2004NutritionReporter.pdf

February2004NutritionReporter.pdf

March2004NutritionReporter.pdf

April2004NutritionReporter.pdf

May2004NutritionReporter.pdf

June2004NutritionReporter.pdf

July2004NutritionReporter.pdf

August2004NutritionReporter.pdf

September2004NutritionReporter.pdf

October2004NutritionReporter.pdf

November2004NutritionReporter.pdf

December2004NutritionReporter.pdf


2005 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2005NutritionReporter.pdf

February2005NutritionReporter.pdf

March2005NutritionReporter.pdf

April2005NutritionReporter.pdf

May2005NutritionReporter.pdf

June2005NutritionReporter.pdf

July2005NutritionReporter.pdf

August2005NutritionReporter.pdf

September2005NutritionReporter.pdf

October2005NutritionReporter.pdf

November2005NutritionReporter.pdf

December2005NutritionReporter.pdf


2006 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2006NutritionReporter.pdf

February2006NutritionReporter.pdf

March2006NutritionReporter.pdf

April2006NutritionReporter.pdf

May2006NutritionReporter.pdf

June2006NutritionReporter.pdf

July2006NutritionReporter.pdf

August2006NutritionReporter.pdf

September2006NutritionReporter.pdf

October2006NutritionReporter.pdf

November2006NutritionReporter.pdf

December2006NutritionReporter.pdf


2007 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2007NutritionReporter.pdf

February2007NutritionReporter.pdf

March2007NutritionReporter.pdf

April2007NutritionReporter.pdf

May2007NutritionReporter.pdf

June2007NutritionReporter.pdf

July2007NutritionReporter.pdf

August2007NutritionReporter.pdf

September2007NutritionReporter.pdf

October2007NutritionReporter.pdf

November2007NutritionReporter.pdf

December2007NutritionReporter.pdf


2008 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2008NutritionReporter.pdf

February2008NutritionReporter.pdf

March2008NutritionReporter.pdf

April2008NutritionReporter.pdf

May2008NutritionReporter.pdf

June2008NutritionReporter.pdf

July2008NutritionReporter.pdf

August2008NutritionReporter.pdf

September2008NutritionReporter.pdf

October2008NutritionReporter.pdf

November2008NutritionReporter.pdf

December2008NutritionReporter.pdf


2009 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2009NutritionReporter.pdf

February2009NutritionReporter.pdf

March2009NutritionReporter.pdf

April2009NutritionReporter.pdf

May2009NutritionReporter.pdf

June2009NutritionReporter.pdf

July2009NutritionReporter.pdf

August2009NutritionReporter.pdf

September2009NutritionReporter.pdf

October2009NutritionReporter.pdf

November2009NutritionReporter.pdf

December2009NutritionReporter.pdf


2010 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2010NutritionReporter.pdf

February2010NutritionReporter.pdf

March2010NutritionReporter.pdf

April2010NutritionReporter.pdf

May2010NutritionReporter.pdf

June2010NutritionReporter.pdf

July2010NutritionReporter.pdf

August2010NutritionReporter.pdf

September2010NutritionReporter.pdf

October2010NutritionReporter.pdf

November2010NutritionReporter.pdf

December2010NutritionReporter.pdf


2011 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2011NutritionReporter.pdf

February2011NutritionReporter.pdf

March2011NutritionReporter.pdf

April2011NutritionReporter.pdf

May2011NutritionReporter.pdf

June2011NutritionReporter.pdf

July2011NutritionReporter.pdf

August2011NutritionReporter.pdf

September2011NutritionReporter.pdf

October2011NutritionReporter.pdf

November2011NutritionReporter.pdf

December2011NutritionReporter.pdf


2012 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2012NutritionReporter.pdf

February2012NutritionReporter.pdf

March2012NutritionReporter.pdf

April2012NutritionReporter.pdf

May2012NutritionReporter.pdf

June2012NutritionReporter.pdf

July2012NutritionReporter.pdf

August2012NutritionReporter.pdf

September2012NutritionReporter.pdf

October2012NutritionReporter.pdf

November2012NutritionReporter.pdf

December2012NutritionReporter.pdf


2013 Nutrition Reporter Newsletters

January2013NutritionReporter.pdf

February2013NutritionReporter.pdf

March2013NutritionReporter.pdf

April2013NutritionReporter.pdf

May2013NutritionReporter.pdf

June2013NutritionReporter.pdf

July2013NutritionReporter.pdf

August2013NutritionReporter.pdf

September2013NutritionReporter.pdf

October2013NutritionReporter.pdf



My review of Syndrome X: The Complete Nutritional Program to Prevent and Reverse Insulin Resistance, by Jack Challem, Burton Berkson, M.D., and Melissa Diane Smith (NY: Wiley, 2000. Paperback, 250 pages plus appendices and index)

I have math anxiety, and you can thank the "New Math" for that. In elementary school, we were taught a completely different system of arithmetic every single year. As an innocent product of this confusion, I was still counting on my fingers in sixth grade. Sure, the class brainiacs could do problems in base seven, and took pride in doing homework that parents (and even older brothers) could not comprehend. The flip side was that the rest of us did not know even our basic multiplication tables, or what hillbilly scholar Jethro Clampett called "ciphering." I probably had more ability with imaginary numbers than with the real ones. I understood the binary system and Venn diagrams, yet routinely bungled even simple long division. That’s the "New Math" for you. As musical satirist (and former Harvard math professor) Tom Lehrer says, "The important thing is to understand what you are doing rather than to get the right answer."

So we ended up with a lot of fairly useless knowledge and virtually no practical ability in getting the job done.

This closely resembles modern medicine.

In math, "X" generally indicates an unknown quantity. But there is nothing unknown about the quantity of Americans that die annually due to diseases discussed in Syndrome X: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer. The total is astounding: over 1.6 million dead. Per year. This actually exceeds the number of all American soldiers killed in all the wars we have ever fought, put together.

Pharmacological medicine has failed to stem this grim tide. What’s worse, drug medicine has become a major killer in its own right. Syndrome X makes no bones about it, citing a 1998 JAMA study reporting that "106,000 hospitalized patients die annually because of adverse drug reactions and 2,216,000 other hospitalized patients have serious but nonfatal drug reactions. . . (A)dverse drug reactions could rank as the fourth leading cause of death, after heart disease, cancer, and stroke." (p. 55)

The extent to which physicians doggedly employ pharmaceuticals indicates the extent to which they are unfamiliar with a safe and effective alternative already right at hand: preventive and therapeutic nutrition. When their ever-sick patients trustingly line up for still more drug prescriptions, surely the blind have been led by the blind.

I value Syndrome X’s appropriate and unhesitating criticism of drug-and-cut medicine. However, the book’s outstanding feature is its straightforward what-you-can-do-about-it approach, complete with both preventive and therapeutic diet plans. I like practical, do-it-yourself advice that is clearly presented, well organized, and reference-filled. And I especially like books that recommend high doses of vitamins and low doses of sugar.

Syndrome X is such a book. It is based to a considerable degree on the pioneering work of Surgeon-Captain Thomas L. Cleave of the British Royal Navy. Half a century ago, Dr. Cleave stood virtually alone as he made one of the first strong scientific cases showing that sugar causes diabetes and a variety of other serious diseases. His classic book, The Saccharine Disease (all about sugar, not the artificial sweetener, and reviewed at http://www.doctoryourself.com/morebooks.html ) was among the first to rigorously condemn modern man’s gross over consumption of refined carbohydrates. While dietitians (with the full support of the food processing industry) have relentlessly denied any such connection, time and research have proven Cleave right.

Syndrome X is written for those fed up with chronic illness. It wastes no words, promptly zeroing in on insulin resistance as a major cause of life-wrecking obesity, fatigue, and adult-onset (Type II) diabetes. Heart disease, still our number one killer, is presented by the authors for what it truly is: a nutritional disease that must be prevented with nutrition and cured by nutrition. And although it is by no means the book’s emphasis, cancer’s roots in malnutrition are also presented.

Everybody knows that reducing their intake of dietary fat is a good idea. Syndrome X presses further, urging people to cut down on, or better yet cut out, refined carbohydrates. To the extent that this means sugar and processed, useless white flour, I could not agree more. But Syndrome X also promotes the somewhat controversial Robert C. Atkins dietary ideal of a relatively high intake animal protein. Animal rights issues aside, I think this is not necessary, nor even a good idea. American diets are already high-protein, many of us eating three or more times the amount of protein we actually require. Long term heavy protein use overloads the kidneys and contributes to early membership in the dialysis-for-lunch bunch. (Williams, S. R. (1993) "Aging Western Kidney" in: Nutrition and Diet Therapy, Seventh Edition, p 668.)

This may not have been a worry for high-risk, short-lived cave men. These original eaters of the Paleolithic Diet that (along with the Mediterranean and Atkins diets) forms the basis of the book’s "Anti-X" diet, probably had enough trouble finding anything to eat. Certainly their diet was very low in sugar. It was probably low in all carbohydrates. For that matter, it was probably low in everything. Ancient hunters were not awash in meat. They were opportunistic and ate what they could get and were lucky to get it. Ever notice how skinny cheetahs are? Nine out of ten cheetah attacks fail to bring down a gazelle. I doubt if humans fared all that much better than could a 50-mile-per-hour sprinting set of claws.

As written, Syndrome X is not pleasant bedtime reading for vegetarians. Since my sympathy has been in the meatless camp for so long now (my now-adult children were raised vegetarian), I think a virtually-vegetarian version of the book might be a particularly good idea. It is also quite possible that the reader can make the necessary veggie adjustments. For instance, nuts and especially seeds are encouraged in the "Anti-X" diet, and they are very good protein sources indeed as long as they are well-chewed. The authors also correctly point out the special value of omega-3 "fish oils" which may, to many people’s surprise, be obtained from green leafy vegetables and even walnuts (p. 94). For near-vegetarians, the book’s support of eggs and low-fat dairy should go down easy. But I must say that, as a big fan of oriental cuisine, the how-to-eat-at-restaurants (Chapter 8) recommendation of having Chinese food with no rice was, for me at least, approaching the impossible.

Lest the wrong impression endure, I wish to praise Syndrome X’s relentless sugar-bashing. THOSE carbos should go, and without a farewell kiss. But I remain a complex-carbo kind of guy, and I have something of an organic-brown-rice macrobiotic streak in me. Whole grains, oatmeal, sweet potatoes and especially legumes (lentils and beans) are high on my list but middle-to-low on the Anti-X diet plan (p.86). Yet the book’s constant stress on whole, high-fiber, unprocessed foods is in general excellent. It is the protein-carbohydrate issue where I disagree.

And now for some unequivocal praise. Chapters 12 through 15 are superb discussions of the value of vitamins E, C, minerals, and other important nutrients, respectively. Recommendations of 400 to 800 International Units (IU) of vitamin E and 2,000 to 4,000 milligrams of vitamin C are right after my own heart (and very good for yours). I have never seen a better guide to purchasing vitamin E than will be found on pages 181-183. Chromium (up to 1,000 micrograms) and magnesium, zinc, selenium, manganese and even newcomer vanadium are all discussed, and discussed well. Coenzyme Q-10, the vitamin C-helping flavinoids, and a number of herbs are considered in brief. Alpha lipoic acid supplementation is singled out for detailed consideration in Chapter 11, a chapter that taught me a great deal. Exercise suggestions, recipes, resources, and guidelines for customizing the diet for your particular needs round out the book.

Syndrome X has a personal "talking to you" style that I enjoy very much. It is easy to read and nonetheless backed up with over 100 scientific studies. It is well designed and user friendly, with many summaries and boxes to highlight key information.

I may still have some residual math anxiety, but I have no hesitation in recommending Syndrome X. No, I am not going to stop advocating near-vegetarianism, because I do believe it to be the very best of diets. But, unlike the proponents of the New Math, I do not care a fig as to exactly how you get the right result as long as you do in fact get it. Syndrome X’s essential message is close enough for me: improve your diet and you will improve your life.

That’s an answer we can all agree on.

(The above review was first published in the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine 2003, 18:1)

In the same issue, Jack responded saying:

I appreciate the overall kind review of our Syndrome X book (the first of three popular books published with this title). The diet plan we describe in Syndrome X is not really an Atkins-style plan. Ours is protein rich, not high protein–an important distinction. It emphasizes animal protein, fish, and vegetables, while deemphasizing sugar- and grain-based carbohydrates. With all due respect, considerable anthropological evidence (published papers by Loren Cordain and S. Boyd Eaton) indicates that there have been no fully vegetarian societies. The majority of Paleolithic and modern Stone Age societies were animal protein dominant, a few were vegetarian dominant (but not anywhere close to 100 percent), and a few were relatively evenly divided in the amounts of animal and plant foods. The basic idea in the research and writings of Cordain and Eaton (and in our Syndrome X book) is that the Paleolithic hunter-gatherer diet is our evolutionary and genetic baseline, which I believe orthomolecular nutrition should build upon. Based on anthropological data from 229 stone-age cultures, some of which existed well into the 20th century, as well as paleontological evidence, pre-agrarian peoples consumed several times today’s officially recommended levels of vitamins and minerals. They consumed more protein and close to a 1:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. (Today, the ratio is approximately 30:1). They did not consume grains, dairy (other than mother’s milk during infancy), or pressed oils; with some exceptions, we may be genetically maladapted to these foods. Vegetables and fruit were uncultivated and had a lower sugar content, and occasionally honey was obtained, with great risk of injury.

Unfortunately, many contemporary vegetarians do not eat much in the way of vegetables. They are hooked on breads and pastas and muffins. Grains, even whole grains, and legumes provide relatively large amounts of carbohydrates relative to other nutrients, such as those found in non-starchy or low-starch vegetables. In effect, such foods displace more nutrient-dense foods. Two books published in 2002 explore the health hazards of grains– Going Against the Grain, by Melissa Diane Smith (who actually conceived the “Anti-X” diet plan in Syndrome X), and Dangerous Grains, by James Braly. The health problems go beyond the huge amount of carbs in grains and legumes–lectins seem at least as unhealthy as gluten proteins. Indeed, while agriculture gave rise to more complex cultures, the extensive use of grains led to a range of degenerative diseases, according to paleontological data. There’s much more in Smith and Braly’s books to cogitate on, such as that whole grains may not be all that much better than refined grains. It’s revolutionary thinking, whether you agree with them or not. I have had other vegetarians ask me about an “Anti-X” diet plan without animal foods. Apparently, there are a number of vegetarians with insulin resistance, which may stem from the large amounts of carbohydrates in the grains and legumes some vegetarians consume. My feeling is this: if a particular diet is making you sick, that is not the right diet plan for you. Again, the problem may be that some vegetarians who do not really understand nutrition. I think a vegetarian could construct a good diet high in vegetables and low in grain-based carbs. But as I’m sure you’re aware, many vegetarians simply avoid animal products rather than how to construct a nutritionally sound vegetarian diet.

In my follow-up book, The Inflammation Syndrome (John Wiley and Sons, March, 2003), the diet plan emphasizes fish and vegetables more than chicken. It offers an anti-inflammatory supplement plan as well. One of the links between the two books is that insulin resistance increases levels of inflammation-promoting cytokines. I certainly agree with Andrew Saul that cutting out junk foods loaded with refined carbohydrates, refined fats, and refined sugars, may be the most important step any person could take. Once a per-son takes this step, it almost doesn’t matter what “good” foods he or she eats.



I also reviewed The Food-Mood Solution: All-Natural Ways to Banish Anxiety, Depression, Anger, Stress, Overeating, and Alcohol and Drug Problems - and Feel Good Again by Jack Challem (Paperback: 288 pages. NJ: Wiley, 2007. ISBN-10: 0470228776; ISBN-13: 978-0470228777)

Lime sherbet makes me crazy. That is not a figure of speech, merely implying that I really like eating it. Rather, it means that eating it literally makes me nuts. I still recall, as a young man, having a double cone of the chartreuse-green stuff. About 30 minutes later, I was, to use my grandmother’s expression, fit to be tied: I was agitated, irritable, angry. I could barely control my behavior, and certainly could not control how I felt. When the haze cleared, I wondered what the heck happened.

It finally dawned on me that it might, just might, be my reaction to the load of sugar and artificial color that I had just ingested. As Dr. Lendon Smith said, if you crave a food, it is probably bad for you. To this day, I am cautious about consuming sugar, and I do not eat artificially colored foods of any kind.

It isn’t just me, and it isn’t just anecdotal. Long dismissed by medical authorities, sugar, food colorings, and other all-too-common food additives do indeed adversely affect mood. In June 2004, Archives of Disease in Childhood reported a study, involving 277 preschool children conducted by the UK's Southampton General Hospital. The findings? Artificial food colorings and other additives increased hyperactive behavior. Said commentator Will Boggs, M.D., "Children's hyperactivity fell after withdrawal of food additives from the children's diets (and) there was an increase in hyperactivity when food additives were re-introduced." If you have ever taught school the day after Halloween, as I have, you already know this.

There is not a teacher, a parent, or for that matter, a human being that would not benefit from reading Jack Challem’s The Food Mood Solution. As the title promises, the book explains exactly how moods go so swiftly south when sugar intake is high, and nutrient intake is low. With personal-use checklists, succinct case stories, plain language, clear organization, and an exceptionally reader-friendly writing style, Challem presents a plan that anyone can follow, and perhaps everyone should. “The world is a meaner, angrier, and more anxious place than it was just a few years ago,” he writes. And without blaming all societal ills on malnutrition, Challem offers real help for real people: keep your blood sugar from crashing by avoiding simple carbs, taking your vitamins, and eating whole foods.

By Chapter Three, Challem is discussing neurotransmitters and the “neuronutrients” that make them work, and in Chapter Four he presents and lists nutritional supplements as the “first step” to improved mood. Orthomolecular quantities are recommended, along with the author’s welcome candor about prevailing anti-vitamin mythology: “Ignore statements warning that the body cannot use more than 200 mg of vitamin C a daily,” he writes, correctly terming that a “paltry recommendation.”

Then, Challem says, there are three further steps: Eat good-mood foods; exercise; and make tactical lifestyle changes to reduce stress. Good, practical, worth-the-cost-of-the-book-and-then-some advice. And there is still more to follow. Chapter Eight addresses anger, aggressiveness and violence, and Chapter Nine is on anxiety, panic attacks and obsessive compulsive behavior. The next chapters discuss ADHD, overweight, depression, bipolar disorder, and alcohol and drug abuse. To bring all these topics in at under 300 pages requires expert writing, something we have come to expect from this author. This book does not disappoint. The Food Mood Solution contains numerous "Quick Tip" boxes and some helpful diagrams. Additional visuals would be a welcome addition, particularly the inclusion of main-point summary tables. Meal plans, recipes, supporting references, a list of available resources, and a thorough index are provided.

Lendon Smith often said that if your children are cranky, give them something to eat. Extending this point, comedian and natural health advocate Dick Gregory asked, “Are you going to have food, or just something to eat?” Big difference. The Food Mood Solution proves the point brilliantly.

(The above review was first published in J Orthomolecular Med 2008, 23:2.)



More articles by Jack Challem are to be found at https://www.betternutrition.com/author/jack

The Riordan Clinic's tribute to Jack: https://riordanclinic.org/2017/08/jack-challem-memorium/

Obituary in Whole Foods magazine: https://wholefoodsmagazine.com/news/breaking-news/jack-challem-nutrition-reporter-dies-66/


Andrew Saul is the author of the books FIRE YOUR DOCTOR! How to be Independently Healthy (reader reviews at http://www.doctoryourself.com/review.html ) and DOCTOR YOURSELF: Natural Healing that Works. (reviewed at http://www.doctoryourself.com/saulbooks.html )

 


Andrew W. Saul

 


AN IMPORTANT NOTE:  This page is not in any way offered as prescription, diagnosis nor treatment for any disease, illness, infirmity or physical condition.  Any form of self-treatment or alternative health program necessarily must involve an individual's acceptance of some risk, and no one should assume otherwise.  Persons needing medical care should obtain it from a physician.  Consult your doctor before making any health decision. 

Neither the author nor the webmaster has authorized the use of their names or the use of any material contained within in connection with the sale, promotion or advertising of any product or apparatus. Single-copy reproduction for individual, non-commercial use is permitted providing no alterations of content are made, and credit is given.


 

 

| Home | Order my Books | About the Author | Contact Us | Webmaster |